Graduate

M.A. Syllabus (From 2017-2018)

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1st Semester

Course Code    : EL 501 
Course Title     : English Phonetics and Phonology
Credits             : 4
Full Marks      : 100

Introduction
The primary aim of this course is to develop students’ understanding of the structure and the articulation of English speech sounds, with reference to phonological theories and with an emphasis on how the speech sounds work in both native and non-native speech in formal and informal contexts. It also intends to develop students’ ability to transcribe speech using the IPA. Additionally, it aims to make learners aware of teaching pronunciation to EFL/ESL students with a particular focus on the Bangla speaking EFL learners.
Intended Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • develop an understanding of the use of different speech organs and apply that awareness to their own speech
  • distinguish between formal and informal as well as native and multilingual English speech
  • transcribe English speech using the IPA with proper stress and intonation marks
  • identify problems of Bangla-speaking learners of English, draw pedagogical implications and design activities for EFL/ESL learners

Course Description and Content

This course covers the basic issues of English phonetics and phonology, which include understanding the structure, articulation and variation of English speech sounds and airstream mechanisms. This course introduces learners to different types of English phones, stress and intonation and various phonological theories. It teaches learners to transcribe speech using the IPA.  Emphasis is also given on the teaching of pronunciation to EFL/ESL learners with a particular focus on the Bangla speaking EFL learners. This course comprises the following:
 

  • Phonemes, phones and allophones
  • Phonological theories: Daniel Jones, Bloomfield and the Bloomfieldians, the Prague School
  • Generative phonology
  • Minimal pairs, complementary distribution and free variation
  • Organs of speech or articulators
  • Categorisation of speech sound segments
  • English short, long vowels and diphthongs
  • Consonant phonemes and their places and manners of articulation
  • Phonetic and phonological characteristics of English consonant phonemes
  • English syllable structure and phonotactics
  • Strong and weak syllables
  • Suprasegmental phenomena: Stress and intonation
  • Aspects of connected speech
  • Transcription using the IPA
  • Pronunciation problems of Bangla-speaking EFL learners
  • Teaching pronunciation of English as an International Language: Issues of attitudes, intelligibility and identity

 
Core Texts
Cruttenden, A. (Ed.). (2008). Gimson’s Pronunciation of English. (7thed.). London: Edward Arnold.
Hyman, L. M. (1975). Phonology: Theory and Analysis. Holt, Rinehart and Winsrton.
Lade foged, P. (2000). A Course in Phonetics. (4thed.). Thomson Wadsworth.
Roach, P. (2009). English Phonetics and Phonology. (4th ed.). Cambridge:  Cambridge University Press.

Recommended Readings
Collins, B. and Mees, I. M. (2008). Practical Phonetics and Phonology. (2nded.). London: Routledge.
Jenkins, J. (2000). The Phonology of English as an International Language. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
O’Connor, J. D. (1980). Better English Pronunciation. (2nded.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Wells, J. C. (2008). Longman Pronunciation Dictionary. (3rded.). London: Longman.

Course Code        : EL 502
Course Title         : Principles and Methods of Language Teaching
Credits                  : 4
Full Marks           : 100

Introduction
This course aims to introduce learners to Applied Linguistics and mainstream educational thoughts and theories that have influenced English Language Teaching (ELT). Learners will explore ELT theories and their rationale and learn to make connections in order to take informed decisions about context-appropriate classroom teaching.
Intended Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • understand the relationship and interdependence of language teaching practices and theory
  • construct a suitable framework for teaching English as a foreign or second language
  • explore the prevalent ELT approaches and methods in relation to teacher roles, learner roles, materials, assessment and context
  • connect the social context with the choice of methods and techniques

 
Course Description and Content
This course explores the fundamental principles, theories and methods of language teaching and enables learners to make connections between theory and practice. It will acquaint learners about the various aspects of language teaching which include, conceptual frameworks, interdependence, interpretation and evaluation of language teaching theories. The roles of teachers, learners, and materials in relation to different approaches and methods are also analysed. Learners are also made aware of the features and issues related to post-method era and pedagogy, appropriate methodology, task-based approaches and critical pedagogy. This course comprises the following:

  • Interdependence of language teaching theories and practices
  • Conceptual frameworks of language teaching
  • Emerging relationship of linguistic theory and language teaching
  • Evaluation of language teaching theories
  • Educational interpretation of language teaching
  • The roles of teachers, learners, materials and techniques in prevalent approaches and methods
  • Context-appropriate pedagogy
  • Communicative approach to ELT and its applications
  • Task based approaches to language teaching
  • The post methods era: Breaking with the method concept
  • Critical pedagogy

Core Texts
Brown, H. D. (2000). Principles of Language Learning and Teaching. (4th ed.). Addison Wesley Longman.
Larsen-Freeman, D. (2000). Techniques and Principles in Language Teaching (2nd ed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Nunan, D. (ed.). (2003). Practical English Language Teaching. New York: McGraw-Hill.
Stern, H, H. (1994). Fundamental Concepts of Language Teaching. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Ur , P. (1996). A Course in Language Teaching. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Recommended Readings
Allwright, D. and K. Bailey (1991). Focus on the Language Classroom. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Bailey, K. M. and D. Nunan (eds.). (1996). Voices from the Language Classroom. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Ellis, R. (2003). Task-based Language Learning and Teaching. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Harmer, J. (2001). The Practice of English Language Teaching (3rd ed.). Pearson Education.
Hedge, T. (2000). Teaching and Learning in the Language Classroom.  Oxford. Oxford University Press.
Holliday, A. (1994). Appropriate Methodology and Social Context. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Johnson, K. (2001) An Introduction to Foreign Language Learning and Teaching. Pearson Education.
Kumaravadivelu, B. (1994). “The post-methods condition: (E)merging strategies for second/foreign language teaching.” TESOL Quarterly. 28/1: 27-48.
Kumaravadivelu, B. (2006). Understanding Language Teaching: From Method to Post-Method. Routledge.
Medgyes, P. (1994). The Non-Native English Teacher. New York: Macmillan Publishers.
Norton, B. and Toohey, K. (eds.). (2004). Critical Pedagogies and Language Learning. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Nunan, D. (1999). Second Language Teaching and Learning. Boston, Mass.: Heine and Heine.
Prabhu, N. S. (1990). “There is no best method – why?” TESOL Quarterly. 24/2: 161-76.
Richards, J. C. and T. S. Rodgers (2001). Approaches and Methods in Language Teaching. (2nd edition). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Schmitt, N. (Ed.). (2002). An Introduction to Applied Linguistics. London: Arnold.

Course Code       : EL 503
Course Title        : Second Language Acquisition
Credits                 : 4
Full marks           : 100

Introduction
This course aims to introduce students to the key concepts and issues in Second Language Acquisition (SLA). It also explores a variety of first and second language acquisition theories that help to understand how learners learn a second language. This course will enable learners to connect second language acquisition theories to their own leaning experiences and educational contexts.

Intended Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • examine different approaches to second language acquisition in diverse contexts
  • gain a thorough understanding of learner factors that influence the course of second language development
  • analyse their own language learning experiences in light of the theories
  • use knowledge gained in the course to critically assess professional practice in their own discipline
  • develop ability to read and utilize relevant SLA research

Course Description and Content
 
This course covers the basic concepts and key issues in second language acquisition. It includes the theories of language learning and SLA. The course will also cover language learning strategies, learner styles, multiple intelligences and various approaches to SLA research.

  • Brief overview of the history of research in Second Language Acquisition
  • Key concepts and issues in SLA
  • Role of L1 in SLA
  • Individual learner differences in SLA: Age, aptitude, cognitive style, motivation and personality
  • Theories of language learning: Behaviorism, innatism, maturation and cognitive theories of learning
  • Theories of second language acquisition: The acculturation model, accommodation theory, the monitor model, and interlanguage theory
  • Universal Grammar (UG)
  • The description of learner language – Error analysis
  • Classroom second language acquisition: The role of input, interaction and feedback
  • Learning styles and language learning strategies
  • Learner autonomy and learner training
  • Multiple intelligences and language learning
  • Current trends in SLA research: Cognitive approaches, socio-cultural perspectives on SLA

Core Texts
Ellis, R. (2008). The study of second language acquisition. 2nd ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Ellis, R. (1985). Understanding Second Language Acquisition. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Dörnyei, Z. (2005). The psychology of the language learner: Individual Differences in Second Language Acquisition. New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
Seville-Troike, M. (2006). Introducing second language acquisition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Recommended Readings
McLaughlin, B. (1987). Theories of second language learning. Edward Arnold.
Cohen, A. and Macaro, E. (eds.), (2009). Language learner strategies: 30 years of research and practice. Oxford University Press.
Gass, S., and Selinker, L. (2008). Second language acquisition: An I
introductory course. (3rd ed.). New York: Routledge.
Little, D., Ridley, J. and Ushioda, E. (2003). Learner Autonomy in the Foreign Language Classroom. Dublin: Authentik.
Mitchell, R., and Myles, F. (2004). Second language learning theories (2nd ed.). London: Arnold.
Oxford, R. (1990). Language learning strategies: what every teacher should know. Boston: Heinle ELT/H and H.

Course Code       : EL 504 (A)
Course Title        : Pragmatics and Discourse Analysis
Credits                 : 4
Full Marks          : 100

Introduction
This course aims to introduce learners to key concepts and issues in pragmatics and discourse analysis. It also intends to develop an understanding of the theoretical principles and processes underlying the analysis of discourse. It will give students an opportunity to explore different approaches to the analysis of written and spoken texts and gain an understanding of language in use.
Intended Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • understand the theories, principles and concepts in pragmatics and discourse analysis
  • identify and analyse the features of spoken and written discourse
  • explore and examine the contextual factors that influence text production and reception
  • show understanding of socially-situated language use
  • appreciate the power dimensions of language use

Course Description and Content
This course gives learners the opportunity to read critically on Discourse Analysis and Pragmatics and use their knowledge to analyze instances of spoken and written texts. Students will gain practical experiences and theoretical understanding. This course comprises the following:

  • Definition and scope of pragmatics and discourse analysis
  • Features of spoken and written discourse
  • Speech Act theory: Austin and Searle
  • Discourse processing and discourse comprehension
  • Context of situation
  • Cooperative principle, presupposition, inference and implicature in discourse
  • Rhetorical organization of texts (theme / rheme, text types)
  • Conversational analysis and preference structure
  • Politeness theories
  • Classroom discourse analysis
  • Critical discourse analysis

 
 
Core Texts
Brown, G. and Yule, G. (1983). Discourse Analysis. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Coulthard, M. (1985). An Introduction to Discourse Analysis. UK: Longman.
Levinson, S. (1983). Pragmatics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Halliday, M. A. K. and Hasan, R. (1976). Cohesion in English. England: Longman.
Recommended Readings
Cutting, J. (2008). Pragmatics and Discourse (2nded.). London: Routledge.
Fairclough, N. (1995). Critical Discourse Analysis. London: Longman.
Grundy, P. (2000). Doing Pragmatics. London: Arnold.
Jaworski, A. and Coupland, N. (eds.). (1999). The Discourse Reader. New York: Routledge.
McCarthy, M. (1991). Discourse Analysis for Language Teachers. Cambridge University Press.
Nunan, D. (1993). Introducing Discourse Analysis. Penguin Books.
Wodak, R. and Meyer, M. (Eds.), (2009). Methods of CDA. London: Sage.

Course Code       : EL 504 (B)
Course Title        : Integrating Technology in the Language Classroom
Credits                 : 4
Full Marks          : 100

Introduction
This course aims to engage students in a critical examination of theoretical, practical and pedagogical issues related to the role and use of technology in language classrooms. The course focuses on relevant research, theory and issues of debate regarding the use of technology in language learning and teaching. Learners will develop necessary skills and knowledge to critically evaluate, design and use a range of technologies in their classrooms.
Intended Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Understand the relationship between methodological approaches to the teaching of a second language and the use of technology.
  • Integrate technology in language teaching and learning.
  • familiarise with recent research, theory and issues of debate in the field of Technology Enhanced Language Learning.
  • Critically evaluate the application of technology with respect to different contextual factors(learner needs, predominant methodological paradigms, infrastructure, cultural setting)

Course Description and Content
This course enables learners to critically analyse the theoretical, practical and pedagogical issues related to the use of technology in the classroom. It will focus on recent technological tools, multimedia theories and relevant research and current debates on technology use in the classroom. This course comprises the following:

  • Pedagogy on technology enhanced language classrooms
  • The nature of reading in a digital world and the development of reading skills through the use of computer-based tasks and the WWW
  • Computer based and networked writing development developing vocabulary with technology
  • Developing listening and speaking with technology
  • Language learning and Web 2.0
  • Synchronous and asynchronous computer mediated communication for language learning
  • Multimedia learning theories

Core Texts
Beetham, H., Sharpe, R. (2007) Rethinking pedagogy for a digital Age: Designing and delivering e-learning. London: Routledge.
Beatty, K. (2010) Teaching and Researching Computer Assisted Language Learning (Second Edition), Longman.
Butler-Pascoe, M. E. and Wiburg, K. (2003). Technology and teaching English language   learners. Boston: Pearson Education.
Chapelle, C. (2006).Assessing language through computer technology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Dudeney, G. and Hockly, N. (2007). How to teach English with Technology. Longman.
Levy, M. & Stockwell, G. (2006). CALL dimensions: Options and issues in computer-assisted language learning. New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum
Teeler, D. and Gray, P. (2006). How to Use the Internet in ELT. Pearson Education Ltd. New Delhi: Longman.
Mayer, R. E. (2009). Multimedia Learning. Cambridge University Press.

Recommended Readings
Collis, B., Moonen, J. (2001). Flexible learning in a digital world: Experience and expectations. London: Kogan Page.
Dudeney, D. (2000). The Internet and the Language Classroom. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Eastment, D. (2007). “Websites for the language teacher: How do you keep up-to-date?” ELT Journal Vol. 61/2April 2007, pp. 187-189
Guth, S. and Helm, F. (2011). “Developing multiliteracies in ELT through telecollaboration.” ELT Journal May 2011, pp. 1-10
Hamano-Bunce, D. (2010). “Talk or chat? Chatroom and spoken interaction in a language classroom.” ELT Journal, December 2011, pp 1-11.
Warshauer, M. and Kern, R. (2000). Network based language teaching concepts and practices. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

2nd Semester

Course Code      :  EL 505
Course Title       :  Syllabus Design and Materials Development
Credits                :  4
Full Marks         :  100
 

Introduction
The course aims to introduce learners to issues and concepts related to syllabus design and materials development. It focuses on providing learners with the knowledge and necessary skills for designing and evaluating syllabuses and language teaching materials. Theoretical insights, principles and recent developments in this field are also emphasized upon.

Intended Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • know the different types of syllabus, the stages of syllabus design and differentiate between syllabus and curriculum
  • understand the issues of syllabus design and materials development
  • comprehend practical, social and theoretical factors affecting ELT materials development and syllabus design
  • evaluate, select and implement appropriate ELT syllabuses and materials.
  • conduct needs analysis and design suitable syllabuses and materials

 
Course Description and Content
This course gives learners the opportunity to read critically issues and concepts related to syllabus design and materials development. It will help learners to use their knowledge to design and evaluate syllabuses. Learners will gain theoretical understanding and practical experience as they design materials for ELT classrooms. This course comprises the following:

  • Definition and scope of syllabus and curriculum
  • Types of syllabus: Structural, situational, notional functional, task based, skill based and content based syllabuses
  • Factors and steps involved in syllabus and curriculum design
  • Syllabus evaluation and design
  • Designing syllabuses for students of different levels
  • Theories and principles of ELT materials design
  • Evaluation and adaptation of ELT materials
  • Designing materials for teaching the four language skills
  • Use of technology in materials design

Core Texts
Dubin, F., and Olshtain, E. (1986). Course design: Developing programs and materials for language learning. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
McDonough, J.; Shaw, C. and Masuhara H.  (2012). Materials and methods in ELT: A teacher’s guide (3rded.). Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell.
Nunan, D. (1988). Syllabus design. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Recommended Readings
Hutchinson, T. and A. Waters.  (1997). English for specific purposes. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Nunan, D. (1989), Designing tasks for the communicative classroom. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Munby, J. (1978). Communicative syllabus design. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
McGrath, I. (2002). Materials Evaluation and Design for Language Teaching. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
Richards, J. C. (2001). Curriculum development in language teaching. New York: Cambridge University Press.
Tomlinson, B. (2011). Materials development in language teaching (2nd ed.) Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
White, R.V. (1988). The ELT curriculum: Design, innovation, and management. Oxford: Blackwell.
Yalden, J. (1987). Principles of Course Design for language teaching. Cambridge University Press.
Yalden, J. (1983). The Communicative syllabus: Evolution, design and implementation. Oxford: Pergamon.

Course Code    : EL506
Course Title     : Language Testing, Evaluation and Assessment
Credits              : 4
Full Marks       : 100

Introduction
This course aims to introduce learners to key concepts and issues in testing, assessment and evaluation. It will also focus on developing an understanding of the theoretical principles and processes underlying test construction as well as the practical skills required for the design, construction, administration, assessment and evaluation of English language tests and programmes. In addition, the course will address the most recent trends and developments in the field of assessment.
Intended Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • understand the theoretical principles which underlie the construction of reliable and valid tests
  • understand the processes involved in designing, administering and evaluating language tests and programmes
  • design and administer valid and reliable tests
  • score exam scripts and interpret test results efficiently
  • evaluate critically different language tests and programmes
  • use different formats/techniques of assessment to ensure optimal achievement

Course Description and Content
This course explores the essential principles of testing and assessment. It familiarizes learners with the basic concepts and current issues in language testing research. Learners are introduced to a range of concepts and terminology related to testing, assessment and evaluation. It begins with a short history of language testing and then moves on to cover the different kinds, types of tests, test formats, item writing and moderation, test construction, moderation, administration testing of grammar and vocabulary and the four skills and alternative assessment. In addition,  evaluation principles, evaluation of programmes, national, international tests and critical language testing are also covered. This course comprises the following:

  • Introduction to testing, assessment and evaluation
  • History of language testing
  • Basic concepts and issues in language testing
  • Types of tests (proficiency, achievement, diagnostic, placement)
  • Approaches to language testing (Direct vs indirect; criterion-referenced vs norm-referenced; discrete point vs integrative; objective vs subjective )
  • Test formats/ Common test techniques
  • Item writing and moderation
  • Test construction and evaluation
  • Testing the language skills: Reading, writing, speaking and listening
  • Testing vocabulary and grammar
  • Grading tests and interpretation of results
  • Test administration.
  • Communicative language testing
  • Evaluation of tests and programme evaluation
  • Current issues in language testing research (alternative assessment, authentic assessment, portfolio assessment)
  • Computerized testing
  • National and international tests (SSC, HSC, BCS, IELTS, TOEFL, GRE)
  • Critical language testing

Core Texts
Alderson, J. C., Clapham, C. and Wall, D. (1995). Language test construction and evaluation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Heaton, J. B. (1990). Classroom language testing. London, UK: Longman.
Hughes, A. (2002). Testing for language teachers (2nded.). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
Recommended Readings
Bachman, L. and Palmer, A. (1996). Language testing in practice. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
Cheng, L.  Watanabe, Y.  and Curtis, A. (eds.), (2004). Washback in language testing: Research contexts and methods. New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum and Associates.
Coombe, C., and Fosle, K. and Hubley, N. (2007). A practical guide to assessing English language learners. Ann Arbour, MI: University of Michigan Press.
Coombe, C., Davidson, P. and Lloyd, D. (eds.). (2009). The fundamentals of language assessment: A practical guide for teachers (2nd Edition). Dubai, UAE: TESOL Arabia Publications.
Douglas, D. (2010). Understanding language testing. London, UK: Hodder Education.
Fox, J. and Wesche, M. (eds.). (2007). Language testing reconsidered. Ottawa, ON: University of Ottawa Press.
Fulcher, G. (2010). Practical language testing. London: Hodder Education.
Fulcher, G. and Davidson, F. (2007). Language testing and assessment. London and New York: Routledge.
Heaton, J.B. (1989). Writing English language tests. London, England: Longman.
McNamara, T. (2000). Language testing. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
Shohamy, E. 2001. The Power of tests: A critical perspective on the uses of language. London, UK: Longman.

Course Code       :  EL 507
Course Title        :  Language Teacher Development and Practicum
Credits                 :  4
Full Marks          :  100

Introduction
The overall aim of this course is to provide an introduction to the principles and practice of language teacher education. It also focuses on the debates about the nature of teaching and teacher development and the relationship between theory and practice in education.
The practicum component will focus on classroom practices; practical application of SLA theories and ELT methodologies; observation of language classes; micro teaching/simulation; lesson/materials preparation and self-evaluation.
Intended Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • understand the nature and needs of teacher education
  • realize the importance of planning a lesson
  • evaluate the examples of current language teacher education programmes
  • specify the purposes of classroom observation
  • demonstrate understanding of pre-service and in-service teacher training programmes
  • understand the constructivist, humanistic and reflective approaches to teacher education

Course Description and Content
This course has a dual focus. The first part exposes learners to the principles, theories, research and practice of teacher education. It also emphasises the importance of teacher training, in-service and pre-service teacher training and professional development. It provides the theoretical principles of lesson planning and classroom observation. The second part provides learners with a platform to link theory to practice and demonstrate understanding of the theoretical principles presented earlier on the courses covered. Learners are required to prepare lesson plans and design materials and conduct a microteaching session. They also have to engage in classroom observation and write a reflective report. This course comprises the following:

  • Current models and theories of teacher education
  • Beliefs, maxims and experiences of teacher development
  • Pre-service and in-service teacher education
  • Teacher as a reflective practitioner
  • Teacher as a researcher
  • Supervision, evaluation, monitoring and mentoring
  • Review of skills teaching
  • Current methodologies in ELT
  • Managing change and innovation in language teaching
  • Lesson planning
  • Microteaching and practicum

Core Texts
Richards, J. and Farrell, T. (2005). Professional Development for Language Teachers: Strategies for Teacher Learning. USA: Cambridge University Press.
Ur, P. (1996). A Course in Language Teaching: Practice and theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Wallace, M. J. (1991). Training foreign language teachers: a reflective approach. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Recommended Readings
Aboud, F. E. (2006). Evaluation of an early childhood preschool program in rural    
Bangladesh. Early    Childhood Research Quarterly 21, 46-60.
Bailey, K. M. (2006). Language Teacher Supervision: A case based approach. USA:
Cambridge University Press.
Freeman, D. and Richards, J. C. (1996). Teacher Learning in Language Teaching.
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Holliday, A. (1994). Appropriate Methodology and Social Context. Cambridge:      Cambridge      University Press.
Johnson, J. (1999). Understanding Language Teaching: Reasoning in Action. Boston:
Heinle/ITP
Koki, S., The Role of Teacher Mentoring in Educational Reform. PREL.
Kotter, J. P., (1995). Leading Change: Why Transformation Efforts Fail. Harvard Business
Review.
Richards, J. C. (1998). Beyond Training: Perspectives on language teacher education.
            Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Richards, J. C. Teacher’s Maxims in Language Teaching. TESOL QUARTERLY Vol. 30,           No. 2, Summer 1996.
Richards, J.C. and Rodgers, T.S. (2001). Approaches and Methods in Language Teaching
(2nded.). USA: Cambridge University Press.
Richardson, V. (Ed.), (1997). Constructivist Teacher Education. London: Routledge and
Falmer.
Roberts, J. (1998). Language teacher education: the reflective trainer. New York: Arnold.
Teachers on Teachers. (NB All experts from Autumn 1989)
The Supervisory Process of EFL Teachers: A Case Study. TEL-EJ 17.1, May 2013 –         Volume 17, Number 1. Chen & Cheng.
Tsui, A. (2003). Understanding Expertise in Teaching: Case Studies of second Language
            Teachers. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
TSUI, A.B.M. Complexities of Identity Formation: A Narrative Inquiry of an EFL Teacher. Hong Kong SAR, China: TESOL QUARTERLY Vol. 41, No. 4,         December        2007.
Williams, M and Burden, R. L. (1997). Psychology for Language Teachers. Cambridge:
Cambridge University Press. Chapter three. pp. 46-64.

Course Code      :  EL 508 (A)
Course Title       :  Research Methodology
Credits               : 4
Full Marks        : 100

Introduction
This course aims to introduce students to key concepts and issues in educational research. It also focuses on developing a clear understanding of approaches, methods and processes involved in Applied Linguistics and ELT research. The overall objective of this course is to impart students with theoretical knowledge and empirical skills to do independent research, write and evaluate research reports.
Intended Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • understand key concepts and issues in educational research
  • understand the process of conducting research
  • explore the prevalent research methods in education
  • understand literature review and do a review of literature
  • understand research instruments and data elicitation techniques
  • analyze and interpret various data
  • report and evaluate research

Course Description and Content
This course will cover the basics of educational research. It will also explore the different types of process research. The course helps students to learn about the process of research and enables them to write research questions, do literature review, collect and analyse data, and finally, produce a research report. This course comprises the following:
 

  • Definition of research; its characteristics and importance
  • The process of research using quantitative and qualitative approaches
  • Identification of the research problem
  • Review of literature
  • Purpose statements, research questions, and hypotheses
  • Research ethics, reliability and validity
  • Quantitative research and data collection
  • Analyzing data, reporting and interpreting quantitative results
  • Qualitative research and data collection
  • Analyzing data, reporting and interpreting qualitative results
  • Reporting and evaluating research
  • Research designs: survey designs; experimental designs; ethnographic designs; mixed methods designs; and action research designs

 
Core Texts
Creswell, J. (2015). Educational Research: Planning, Conducting, and Evaluating Quantitative and Qualitative Researc, 5th Edition. Pearson Education,
Dörnyei, Z. (2007). Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Oxford University Press
Recommended Readings
Brown, J. D. and Rodgers, T. S. (2002). Doing Second Language Research. Oxford University Press.
Cohen, L., Manion, L. and Morrison, K. (2011). Research Methods in Education. Routledge
Heigham, J. and Croker, R. (Eds.). (2009). Qualitative Research in Applied Linguistics: A Practical Introduction. Palgrave Macmillan.
McDonough, J. and  McDonough, S. (1997). Research Methods for English Language Teachers. Arnold.
Nunan, D. (1992). Research Methods in Language Learning. Cambridge University Press.
Neuman, W.L.(2000). Social Research Methods. Boston Allyn and Bacon.
Seliger, H. W. and Shohamy, E. (1989). Second Language Research Methods. Oxford University Press.
Wiersma, W. (1995). Research Methods in Education. Boston Allyn and Bacon.

Introduction
The course focuses on the development and spread of English as a global Language. It surveys the social and linguistic characteristics and roles of English in societies around the world.  It examines the status of English in diverse world contexts and its socio-political and educational implications.
Intended Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • Examine the linguistic characteristics of the new Englishes
  • Understand the roles played by different varieties of English in different contexts
  • Comprehend the debates and discussions surrounding the spread of English
  • Reflect on English language education in the light of current theory and research in world Englishes

 
Course Description and Content
This course covers the key issues related to the development of English as a global language and a Lingua Franca. It explores various models of the spread of English, status and functions of English, and emergence and features of New Englishes in diverse world contexts. The course also focuses on the implications of linguistic imperialism and the future of English. This course comprises the following:

  • English as an International Language – historical, political, economic and cultural reasons
  • Spread of English in the world – Kachru’s and McArthur’s models
  • Functions and status of English world-wide
  • Linguistic characteristics of New Englishes (Nigerian, Singaporean and South Asian Englishes)
  • Standard English debate
  • Linguistic imperialism
  • English as a Lingua Franca (ELF)
  • Multilingual language use: Linguistic hybridity, style and identity
  • Implications for English Language Teaching
  • Future of English

 
Core Texts
Canagarajah, S. (1999). Resisting Linguistic Imperialism in English Teaching. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Crystal, D. (2003). English as a Global Language. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (2nd Edition)
Kirkpatrick, A. (2007). World Englishes: Implications for International Communication and English Language Teaching. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Phillipson, R. (1992). Linguistic Imperialism. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Recommended Readings
Bex, T. and Watts, R. (1999). Standard English: The Widening Debate. London: Routledge.
Block, D. and Cameron, D. (Eds.), (2002). Globalization and Language Teaching. London: Routledge.
Ferguson, G. (2006). Language Planning and Education. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
Jenkins, J. (2003). World Englishes. London: Routledge.
Kachru, B. (1986). The Alchemy of English: The Spread, Functions and Models of Non-native Englishes. Oxford: Pergamon.
McArthur, T. (1998). The English Languages. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Pennycook, A. (1994). The Cultural Politics of English as an International Language: London: Longman.

Course Code        :  EL 509 (I)
Course Title         :  Presentation and Viva-Voce
Credits                  : 1
Full Marks           :  25

Introduction
The main goals of presentation in this course are to introduce the students to the basics of presentations, different techniques of preparing multimedia presentations and enhance their presentation skills for academic purposes.
There will be an oral examination at the end of each semester. The objectives of the oral examination are to assess students’ knowledge and understanding of the concepts, issues, and theories they are expected to learn from the courses offered in each semester. The examination committee will hold the viva-voce at the end of the semester final examination.
Intended Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • understand the features of a good presentation
  • prepare interactive multimedia presentations
  • enhance their presentation skills
  • boost their confidence to face an interview board
  • develop their oral skills to express and analyse a concept clearly

Course Description and Content
This course provides learners with a foundation for delivering sound academic presentations. They are introduced to the fundamentals of professional presentations. Learners are required to give individual presentations on research articles from a reputed journal in the field.  Learners are required to sit for the Viva Voce based on what they have studied and learned from the courses on their MA programme. This course comprises the following:

  • Features of a good presentation
  • Interactive power point presentations
  • Techniques/strategies of making good presentations
  • Giving multimedia presentations

Recommended Readings
Bradbury, A. (2000). Successful presentation skills, (2nd Edition). Kogan Page Ltd.
Peter, L. and Bolster, A. (2016). Academic Presenting and Presentations. Books on Demand.
Online resources, sample presentations on Youtube, TedTalks will be explored by the students.

Course Code : EL 509 (II)
Course Title : Presentation and Viva-Voce
Credits: 1
Full Marks : 25

This course is same as EL 509 (I).