Graduate

Course Code : Eng. 501
Course Title : Literary Theory
Credits : 4
Full Marks : 100

Introduction

This course helps students explore different schools of modern literary theory. The focus is on familiarizing students with various ways in which scholars have interpreted texts using methods that they have developed. It will enable students to acquire an epistemological understanding of the world through the study of literary theory.

Intended Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, the students will be able to:

  • distinguish between different literary theories and criticism
  • understand the application of different modern theories in literary analysis
  • individually analyze literary texts using different theories
  • demonstrate an awareness of the interconnectedness among the different schools of literary theory

Course Description and Content

This course introduces the major schools of 20th and 21st century literary theory and criticism. Emphasis is given on the major trends in the history of criticism, ranging from Russian formalism and structuralism to post-structuralism, New Historicism and others. Representative essays of individual theories are studied in class.

Formalism and Structuralism

  • Victor Shklovsky, “Art as Technique,” Rice and Waugh (ed.) Literary Theory
  • Ferdinand Saussure, from Course in General Linguistics, Rice and Waugh (ed.) Literary Theory
  • Cleanth Brooks, “The Formalist Critics,” Vincent B. Leitch (ed.), The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism

Psychoanalytical Criticism

  • Sigmund Freud, “The Uncanny,” “The Dream-Work”
  • Jacques Lacan, “The Mirror Stage”

Marxism

  • Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, The Communist Manifesto
  • Antonio Gramsci, “Hegemony,” Rivkin and Ryan (ed.) Literary Theory: An Anthology, Second edition
  • Louis Althusser, “Ideology and Ideological State Apparatuses”

Feminism

  • Sandra Gilbert and Susan Gubar, from The Madwoman in the Attic, Rice and Waugh (ed.) Literary Theory
  • Chandra T. Mohanty, “Under Western Eyes: Feminist Scholarship and Colonial Discourse”
  • Luce Irigaray, This Sex Which Is Not One

Post-Structuralism and Deconstruction

  • Jacques Derrida: “Differánce,” Rivkin and Ryan (ed.), Literary Theory: An Anthology, Second edition
  • Jean Baudrillard, “The Orders of Simulacra,” Rice and Waugh (ed.) Literary Theory

Postcolonialism

  • Frantz Fanon: from Wretched of the Earth, “Pitfalls of the Nationalist Consciousness,” Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism
  • Edward Said, from Culture and Imperialism, Rice and Waugh (ed.), Literary Theory
  • Homi Bhabha, “Of Mimicry and Man: The Ambivalence of Colonial Discourse,” Rice and Waugh (ed.), Literary Theory
     

New Historicism

  • Stephen Greenblatt, “Introduction to the Power of Forms in the English Renaissance,” The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism
  • Michel Foucault, “History of Sexuality,” Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism
  • Louis Montrose, New Historicism and Renaissance Culture

Recommended Readings

  • Barry, Peter. Beginning Theory. Manchester UP, 2002.
  • Booker, Keith M. A Practical Introduction to Literary Theory and Criticism. Longman, 1996.
  • Castle, Gregory. The Blackwell Guide to Literary Theory. Blackwell, 2007.
  • Eagleton, Terry. Literary Theory: An Introduction. Minnesota UP, 1996.
  • Nayar, Pramod K. Contemporary Literary and Cultural Theory. Pearson, 2009.
  • Raman Selden et al. A Reader’s Guide to Contemporary Literary Theory. Kentucky UP, 1993.

Course Code : Eng. 502
Course Title : From Modernism to Postmodernism
Credits : 4
Full Marks : 100

Introduction
This course provides a contemporary perspective on modernism and postmodernism. Students will read key texts to appreciate the distinctive features of both movements and to locate the cultural transformations in historical contexts. This course intends to further develop students’ ability to undertake literary analysis, understand and employ critical theory and interrogate cultural texts of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.
Intended Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • demonstrate awareness of the varying definitions of modernism and postmodernism
  • discuss and analyze the historical and cultural contexts of modernism and postmodernism
  • appreciate the similarities and differences between the texts of “High Modernism” and postmodernism
  • recognize the cultural shifts in literary texts from modernism to postmodernism
  • draw upon a range of theoretical concepts to explain and analyze literary texts
  • explain the postmodern signatures in the texts they study

Course Description and Content
In order to gain an overview of modernism and the subsequent cultural turn towards postmodernism, students will read a range of texts to trace the critical emergence of these two movements in British, American and other literatures and cultures. The course will focus on the thematic and formal aspects of modernism and postmodernism in the texts selected for study. Theory

Jean Francois Lyotard, The Postmodern Condition: A Report on Knowledge
Jean Baudrillard, Symbolic Exchange and Death, “Simulacra and Simulations”
Ihab Hassan, “Toward a Concept of Postmodernism,” “POSTmodernISM: a Paracritical Bibliography”
Fredrick Jameson, “The Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism”
Charles Jenks, “The Death of Modern Architecture”
 
Selections from From Modernism to Postmodernism: An Anthology, edited by Lawrence Cahoone, Blackwell, 2003
Modernism
James Joyce, Excerpts from Ulysses (Norton Anthology, vol. 2, 7th edition)

  1. S. Eliot, “The Hollow Men,” “Gerontion”

Ezra Pound, “A Retrospect”
Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse
Postmodernism
Selections from Norton Anthology of Postmodern American Fiction, edited by Paula Geyh et al.                        

Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Strange Pilgrims
Milan Kundera, Book of Laughter and Forgetting
John Barth, “Lost in the Funhouse”

Recommended Readings
Brooker, Peter, editor. Modernism/Postmodernism. Pearson, 1992.
Butler, Christopher. Postmodernism: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford UP, 2002.
Docherty, Thomas, editor. Postmodernism: A Reader. Routledge, 1993.
Levenson, Michael, editor. The Cambridge Companion to Modernism. Cambridge UP, 1999.
Matthews, Steven. Modernism. Arnold, 2004.
Natoli, Joseph P., and Linda Hutcheon. A Postmodern Reader. State University of New York Press, 1993.

Course Code : 503
Course Title : Presentation and Viva Voce
Credits : 1
Full Marks : 20

Introduction
This course is designed to develop the oral and presentation skills of the students. The focus of this course is to make students familiar with professional presentation skills and to instil confidence in them for public speaking following academic conventions.
Intended Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • demonstrate enhanced presentation skills
  • use primary and secondary sources
  • acknowledge sources of information appropriately
  • speak in English confidently
  • use multimedia effectively
  • handle question-answer sessions confidently
  • recognise the dangers of plagiarism

 
Course Description and Content
This course gives students an opportunity to practice oral skills. It emphasizes analyzing and synthesizing information gathered from secondary sources. The course focuses on the importance of eye contact, body language and vocal tone as well as of the conventions of using transitional signals. Various strategies of handling question-answer sessions and of using technology in oral presentations (e.g. multimedia) are also taught in this course.
Recommended Readings
Berkun, Scott. Confessions of a Public Speaker. O’Reilly Media, 2009.
Bradbury, Andrew. Successful Presentation Skills. Kogan Page, 2006.
Steele, William R. Presentation Skills 201. Outskirts Press, 2009.
Theobald, Theo. Develop Your Presentation Skills: Be Charismatic, Give a Polished
Performance. Kogan Page, 2011.
Weissman, Jerry. Presenting to Win: The Art of Telling Your Story. FT Press, 2003.

Course Code : Eng. 504
Course Title : Contemporary British Literature
Credits : 4
Full Marks : 100

Introduction

The course introduces students to a wide variety of texts by contemporary British writers to make them aware of the significance of the cultural and contextual influences under which these literary texts are written and received. It attempts to sensitize students to the underlying theoretical constructs such as postmodernism, absurdism, feminism etc.
Intended Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • read and respond to texts critically, showing an awareness of how writers use and adapt language, form and structure to create meaning in texts
  • demonstrate understanding of the socio-cultural and political contexts in which texts have been produced and received
  • read and analyze texts in the light of contemporary literary theories that are relevant to the issues raised in the texts

Course Description and Content

The course introduces students to a selection of poetry, novels and drama to allow them to explore the evolving and experimental forms and techniques used by the writers to portray the socio-cultural and political milieu of modern Britain. It gives them an opportunity to explore key issues such as the impact of war and the radical restructuring of gender and class structure in post-war Britain as overarching concerns in many of the texts.

Content

  • Philip Larkin: “Church Going,” “MCMXIV,” “Talking in Bed,” “Ambulances,” “High Windows,” “Sad steps,” “The Explosion,” “Aubade”
  • Ted Hughes: “Wind,” “Relic,” “Pike,” “The Seven Sorrows,” “Daffodils,” “Morse,”
  • Seamus Heaney: “Digging”, “The Forge”, “Punishment”, “Casualty”
  • James Fenton: “A German Requiem,” “Wind”
  • Carol Ann Duffy: “Prayer,” “Text,” “The Love Poem,” “Valentine,” “Syntax”
  • Tom Stoppard, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead
  • Harold Pinter, The Caretaker
  • S. Naipaul, The Enigma of Arrival
  • S. Byatt, Possession

Recommended Readings
Bradbury, Malcolm. The Contemporary English Novel (Stratford Series). Hodder and Stoughton, 1979.
English, James F., A Concise Companion to Contemporary British Fiction. Blackwell, 2006.
Ford, Boris, editor. Pelican Guide to English Literature, Vol.8, The Present. Penguin, 1988.
Hayman, Ronald. British Theatre since 1955: A Reassessment. Oxford UP, 1979.
Schmidt, Michael and Grevel Lindop. British Poetry since 1960.Carcanet, 1972.
Thwaite, Anthony. Twentieth Century English Poetry. Barnes and Noble, 1978.

Course Code  : Eng. 505
Course Title   : Shakespeare
Credits            : 4
Full Marks     : 100
 

Introduction
This course provides students with an in-depth understanding of Shakespeare and to develop a nuanced interpretation of the texts. Students will be introduced to critical approaches to the study of Shakespeare’s works where they will learn to apply theoretical concepts to the analysis of individual plays. The course also draws attention to the importance of historical context in the reading of the texts.
Intended Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of Shakespeare
  • interpret Shakespeare from different theoretical and ideological perspectives
  • connect Shakespeare to their own cultural landscape
  • view Shakespeare from a global perspective

Course Description and Content
The course will examine a range of genres from tragedy to comedy to history plays and late romances to develop an overview of Shakespeare’s contribution to English drama and to appreciate the scope of his work. Additionally, students will examine Shakespeare in the Elizabethan context as well as from a global perspective to connect Shakespeare’s texts to local culture and the contemporary world.
Content

  • A Midsummer Night’s Dream
  • As You Like It
  • Julius Caesar
  • Othello
  • The Tempest

(Any of the following editions will be acceptable: Arden, Oxford, Cambridge, New Pelican, Penguin)

Recommended Readings
Bloom, Harold, editor. Bloom`s Modern Critical Interpretations: William Shakespeare.
Infobase Publishing, 2010.
Dobson, Michael, and Stanley Wells, editors. Oxford Companion to Shakespeare. Oxford UP, 2001.
Drakakis, John. editor. Alternative  Shakespeares. Methuen, 1985.
Grazia, Margaret de, and Stanley Wells, editors. Cambridge Companion to Shakespeare.
Cambridge UP, 2001.
Greenblatt, Stephen. Will in the World: How Shakespeare Became Shakespeare. Norton, 2004.
—. Shakespearean Negotiations. California UP, 1988.
Kott, Jan. Shakespeare, Our Contemporary. Norton, 1974.
McDonald, Russ, editor. Shakespeare: An Anthology of Criticism and Theory 1945-2000. Blackwell, 2004.
Wells, Stanley, Gary Taylor, John Jowett, and William Montgomery, editors. The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works. Oxford UP, 1986.

Course Code  : 506
Course Title   : Presentation and Viva Voce
Credits            : 1
Full Marks     : 20

Introduction
The aim of the course is to develop the oral and presentation skills of the students. The focus of this course is to make students familiar with professional presentation skills and to instil confidence in them for public speaking following academic conventions.
Intended Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • demonstrate enhanced presentation skills
  • use primary and secondary sources
  • acknowledge sources of information appropriately
  • speak in English confidently
  • use multimedia effectively
  • handle question-answer sessions confidently

 
Course Description and Content
This course gives students an opportunity to practice oral skills. It emphasizes analyzing and synthesizing information gathered from secondary sources. The course focuses on the importance of eye contact, body language and vocal tone as well as of the conventions of using transitional signals. Various strategies of handling question-answer sessions and of using technology in oral presentations (e.g. multimedia) are also taught in this course.

Recommended Readings
Berkun, Scott. Confessions of a Public Speaker. O’Reilly Media, 2009.
Bradbury, Andrew. Successful Presentation Skills. Kogan Page, 2006.
Steele, William R. Presentation Skills 201. Outskirts Press, 2009.
Theobald, Theo. Develop Your Presentation Skills: Be Charismatic, Give a Polished
Performance. Kogan Page, 2011.
Weissman, Jerry. Presenting to Win: The Art of Telling Your Story. FT Press, 2003.

Course Code  : Eng.507
Course Title   : Modern American Literature
Credits            : 4
Full Marks     : 100

Introduction
The course introduces students to a wide variety of texts by American writers to make them conscious about the social, cultural, and political contexts of modern American literature. Students will be aware of and appreciate the multicultural voices that characterize the American literary tradition.
Intended Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • demonstrate knowledge of selected texts in modern American literature
  • obtain an understanding of key critical and literary concepts of the American context, which includes race, democracy, class, gender, capitalism, and  transnationalism
  • identify, describe and critically evaluate major developments in American literature

Course Description and Content
The course introduces students to a selection of prose, poetry, and drama in relation to their historical and cultural contexts. Texts are carefully selected to represent the great variety of American literature.

Content
Prose
Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man
Vladimir Nabokov, Pale Fire
John Updike, Rabbit, Run
Saul Bellow, Seize the Day
Maxine Hong Kingston, The Woman Warrior
Thomas Lynchon, The Crying of Lot 49
Sandra Cisneros, House on Mango Street
Jhumpa Lahiri, Namesake

Poetry
Selections from Robert Lowell, Langston Hughes, Wallace Stevens, William Carlos Williams, Sylvia Plath, Allen Ginsberg, Adrienne Rich, John Ashberry, Anne Sexton

Drama
Amiri Baraka, Dutchman
Sam Shepard, Buried Child
Tennessee Williams, A Streetcar Named Desire

Recommended Readings
Elliott, Emory. The Columbia History of the American Novel. Columbia UP, 1991.
Ford, Boris, editor. The New Pelican Guide to English Literature: Vol. 9. American Literature. Penguin, 1988.
Kaplan, Amy. The Social Construction of American Realism. Chicago UP,1992.
Nicol, Bran, editor. Postmodernism and the Contemporary Novel: A Reader. Edinburgh UP, 2002.
Pizer, Donald. The Cambridge Companion to American Realism and Naturalism. Cambridge UP, 1995.
Poulin, A., Jr., editor. Contemporary American Poetry. Wadsworth, 2005.

Course Code  : Eng. 508
Course Title   : Cultural Studies
Credits            : 4
Full marks      : 100

Introduction

This course introduces students to the concept of cultural studies. Cultural Studies is an interdisciplinary field where theories from different disciplines are analyzed to understand culture in its various manifestations: the complex and multifaceted relations of culture and society, culture and class, and culture and power. Students will focus on how cultural processes and products are conceptualized, distributed, consumed and responded to in diverse ways.
Intended Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • form a comprehensive idea about culture and different forms of culture, and the relationship between society and power
  • learn about the major factors determining identity, ethnicity, race and gender relations
  • demonstrate understanding of concepts of ideology, power, hierarchy and other factors influencing culture
  • understand what cultural turns are taking place with the advent of postmodernism, visual culture, the internet, and artificial intelligence
  • engage in interdisciplinary analysis when they connect literary theories to cultural studies

 

Course Description and Content
This course has two main streams. The first stream deals with the prominent scholars of Cultural Studies, such as Raymond Williams, Louis Althusser, Stuart Hall, Jean-Francois Lyotard and Mikhail Bakhtin. Their theories on power structures and society will be extensions of the theories studied in other courses. In the second stream, mass and popular cultures are introduced. Selected essays on image representation and identity are studied.

Content
Roland Barthes, “Rhetoric of the Image”
Raymond Williams, “The Analysis of Culture”
Laura Mulvey, “Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema”
Michel Foucault, “Method”
Antonio Gramsci, “Hegemony, Intellectuals and the State”
Mikhail Bakhtin, “Carnival and Carnivalesque”
Jean-François Lyotard, “The Postmodern Condition”
Stuart Hall, “Notes on Deconstructing ‘the Popular’”

  1. W. Watson, “Multiculturalism in Historical Perspective”

Christine Geraghty, “Soap Opera and Utopia”
Jacqueline Bobo, “The Color Purple: Black Women as Cultural Readers”
Michael de Certeau, “Walking in the City”
Ashish Rajadhyaksha, “The ‘Bollywoodization’ of the Indian Cinema”
Donna Haraway, “A Cyborg Manifesto”
Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimer, “Enlightenment as Mass Deception”
Walter Benjamin, “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction”

Recommended Readings
Berges, John. Ways of Seeing. Penguin, 1972.
Brooker, Peter. A Concise Glossary of Cultural Theory. Bloomsbury, 1999.
Debord, Guy. The Society of the Spectacle. Black & Red,1970.
During, Simon, editor. The Cultural Studies Reader. Routledge, 1999.
Longhurst, Brian et al. Introducing Cultural Studies. Pearson Education, 2008.
Milner, Andrew and Jeff Browitt. Contemporary Cultural Theory – An Introduction. Psychology Press, 2002.
Nayar, Promod K. An Introduction to Cultural Studies. Viva Books, 2008.
Rivkin, Julie and Ryan, Micheal.  Literary Theory – An Anthology. Blackwell, 1998.
Smith, Mark J. Culture: Reinventing the Social Sciences. Open University Press, 2001.
Storey, John, editor. Cultural Theory and Popular Culture – A Reader. Routledge, 1994.
—. Cultural Theory and Popular Culture – An Introduction. Pearson Education, 1997.
Watson, C. W.  Multiculturalism, Open University Press, 2000.

Course Code : Eng. 509
Course Title : Continental Literature
Credits : 4
Full Marks : 100

Introduction

The course makes students aware of the diversity in literature written in English by introducing them to modern European literature. Students will engage with a wide variety of texts by European writers of the late 19th to early 20th century to gain an understanding of socio-cultural and continental influences in which texts are produced and received. The course objectives include encouraging students to read and analyze the texts in the light of wider global perspectives, using theoretical constructs relevant to the texts.

Intended Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • develop and demonstrate an awareness of the significance of Continental  literature in the global arena
  • gain a comprehensive knowledge of post-world war conventions, conflicts and issues of Europe
  • enhance their abilities of inter-textual analysis

Course Description and Content
The course teaches novel, drama and poetry written by the prominent writers of the modern and postmodern movements in Europe.  It examines the different strategies used by the writers to portray the European socio-cultural and political milieu. This course also highlights the underlying theoretical constructs and key issues of Absurdism, Existentialism, Surrealism, Hyperrealism, Futurism among others.

Content
Henrik Ibsen, A Doll’s House
Charles Baudelaire, Selected Poems
Franz Kafka, The Metamorphosis
Albert Camus, The Outsider
Luigi Pirandello, Six Characters in Search of an Author
Eugene Ionesco, Rhinoceros
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Notes from the Underground
Dario Fo, The Accidental Death of an Anarchist
José Saramago, Blindness
Federico García Lorca, Selected Poems

Recommended Readings
Benjamin, Walter. Charles Baudelaire. Verso, 1992.
Duran, Manuel. Lorca, Prentice Hall, 1962.
Gide, Andre. Dostoevsky. Greenwood Press, 1979.
Gold, Stanley Corn. The Metamorphosis. Norton Critical Editions, 1996.
Preece, Julian. Kafka, Cambridge UP, 2002.
Turnell, Martin. Baudelaire, Hamish Hamilton, 1947.
Williams, Raymond. Drama from Ibsen to Brecht, Penguin, 1968.
Foley, John. Albert Camus: From the Absurd to Revolt. McGill-Queen’s UP, 2008.

Course Code : Eng. 510
Course Title : Women and Literature
Credits : 4
Full Marks : 100

Introduction

This course gives students an in-depth view of a range of debates on gender prevailing in academia. While the course will encourage students to broadly question normative gender roles, it will also help students to distinguish the intersections of gender, race, class, religion, and geographical location. The course, therefore, introduces students to the works of women writers representing diverse cultures and concerns.

Intended Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • demonstrate an understanding of the gender debates and arguments articulated by the authors in the syllabus
  • recognize the diversity amid the apparent unity that feminist authors represent
  • recognize the intersections between feminism and postcolonialism
  • make connections between the problems posed in the theoretical and the creative texts

 

Course Description and Content
The course contains theoretical and creative works on women’s issues by writers from Africa, South Asia, Europe and North America. Even within the same geographical region, there are writers from different ethnicities. The writings range from the nineteenth century to contemporary times. The idea is to expose learners to as much diversity as possible to break away from the construct of feminism as a Western concern.

Content
Critical Writings

Simone de Beauvoir, The Second Sex (Introduction; Chapter XI – Myth and Reality)
Helene Cixous, The Laugh of the Medusa (extract)
Jane Flax, “Postmodernism and Gender Relations in Feminist Theory”
Judith Butler, “Performative Acts and Gender Constitution”
Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, “Three Women’s Texts and a Critique of Imperialism”
bell hooks,  “Postmodern Blackness”
Carole Stabile, Feminism and the Technological Fix (extract)

Novels
Virginia Woolf, Orlando
Jean Rhys, Wide Sargasso Sea
Bapsi Sidhwa, Ice Candy Man
Ursula K. Le Guin, The Left Hand of Darkness
Short Stories
Roquiah Sakhawat Hossein, Sultana’s Dream
Ama Ata Aidoo, “Lice”
Charlotte Perkins Gilman, “The Yellow Wallpaper”
Kate Chopin, “The Story of an Hour”
Doris Lessing, “To Room Nineteen”
Alice Walker, “The Abortion”
Poetry
Selections from:
Christina Rossetti
Maya Angelou
Adrienne Rich
Kamala Suraiya
 

Drama
Ntozake Shange, For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow Is Enuf

 
Memoir
Fatima Mernissi, Dreams of Trespass: Tales of a Harem Girlhood

Recommended Readings
Eagleton, Mary, editor. Feminist Literary Theory: A Reader. Blackwell, 2001.
Gamble, Sarah, editor. The Routledge Companion to Feminism and Postfeminism. Routledge, 2001.
Gilbert, Sandra M. and Susan Gubar, editors. The Norton Anthology of Literature by Women. Norton, 1996.
Hossein, Roquiah Sakhawat. Roquiah Rachanabali. Uttaran, 2006.
Kaplan, Cora and David Glover, editors. Genders. Routledge, 2000.
Mills, Sara.“Gender and Colonial Space,” Gender, Space and Culture, vol.3, no.2, 1996.
Moi, Toril. Sexual/Textual Politics: Feminist Literary Theory. Methuen, 1985.
Ruthven, K. Feminist Literary Studies: An Introduction. Cambridge UP, 1991.
Sedgwick, Eve Kosovsky. Epistemology of the Closet. California UP, 1990.
Stratton, Florence. Contemporary African Literature and the Politics of Gender. Routledge, 1994.
Tharu, Susie and K. Lalita. Women Writing in India, vol. 1, Feminist Press, 1991.

Course Code : Eng. 511
Course Title : Translation Studies
Credits : 4
Full Marks : 100

Introduction
This course introduces learners to the theory and practice of translation. It will also focus on the most significant developments in the history of the academic discipline of translation studies. Besides providing students with intellectual and philosophical insights into the practice of translation, this course intends to enhance learners’ practical translation skills.

Intended Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of the course, the students should be able to:

  • understand key concepts of translation studies as an academic discipline
  • evaluate translated texts in the light of translation theories as well as issues such as gender, power relations and postcolonialism.
  • put their theoretical knowledge into practice while translating texts from a source language to a target language

 

Course Description and Content
This course will cover two aspects of the art of translation: theory and practice. Through it students will become familiar with theoretical aspects of translation studies and receive practical training in translation by engaging in translating texts from English to Bangla and vice versa. It will require students to translate poetry, prose, drama extracts and non-literary texts from English to Bangla and vice versa.

Content

  • Types of translation
  • Translation processes
  • The unit of translation
  • Equivalence in translation
  • Text, genre and discourse shifts in translation
  • Untranslatability
  • Loss and gain in translation
  • Agents of power in translation
  • Ideology and translation
  • History of translation theory
  • Problems of translating prose, poetry and drama
  • Evaluating translations of texts from English to Bangla and vice versa.
  • Cultural translation
  • Machine translation

 

Core Texts
Basnett, Susan. Translation Studies: An Introduction. Psychology Press, 2002.
Hatim, Basil A. and Jeremy Munday, editors. Translation: An Advanced Resource Book.   Routledge, 2005.
Madder, Marian. Bengali Poetry into English: An Impossible Dream. Editions India,1977.
Venuti, Lawrence. editor. The Translation Studies Reader. Routledge, 2004.
Zaman, Niaz, editor. Translation: Theory and Practice. Academic Press and Publishers     Limited, 2004.
Recommended Readings
 
Alam, Fakrul. Selected Poems of Jibanananda Das.University Press Ltd, 2010.
—– and Ahsanuzazama, Ahmed. Translation Studies: Eploring Identities. Dhaka: writers.ink,       2015.
Baker, Mona. A Coursebook on Translation. Routledge, 2011.
House, Juliane. Translation. Oxford UP, 2009.
Huda, Md. Nurul, editor. Poetry of Nazrul Islam in English Translation, vol.1. Nazrul Institute, 2014.
Munday, Jeremy. Introducing Translation Studies. Routledge, 2012.
Robinson, Douglas. Becoming a Translator: An Accelerated Course. Routledge, 1997.
Steiner, George. After Babel. Oxford UP, 1998.
Tagore, Rabindranath. Gitanjali. Dover Publications, 2011.
Venuti, Lawrence. The Translator’s Invisibility: A History of Translation. Routledge, 2008.

Course Code : Eng. 512
Course Title : Latin American Literature
Credits : 4
Full Marks : 100

Introduction

This course introduces students to a range of texts by authors from Latin America. Learners will gain an understanding of how the legacy of colonialism is reflected in the region in the works of authors and be able to connect the texts with other postcolonial literatures. The course is designed to familiarize students with some of the problems and debates about Latin American history, society, and culture.

Intended Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • perceive the importance of literatures outside the British canon
  • understand colonialism in its different manifestations and the postcolonial experience
  • make connections between the Latin American situation and our own situation as a former colony
  • recognize the narrative style and perspectives as distinct from Euro-centric and Western perspectives
  • make connections between the texts of this course and the ideas of literary theories

Course Description and Content
Latin America is a region full of contrasts; its population is both racially and culturally heterogeneous. This course introduces students to a selection of poetry, novels, and prose pieces by Latin American authors, mostly belonging to the 20th century, that highlight this diversity and heterogeneity. It provides an exposure to a broader range of literary texts.

Content
Ruben Dario (Felix Ruben Garcia Sarmiento), Selected Poems (Translated and Edited by Lysander Kemp)
Cesar Vallejo, Spain, Take This Cup from Me
Jorge Luis Borges, Labyrinths (“The Wall and the Books,” “The Argentine Writer and Tradition,” “The Narrative Art and Magic,” “The Library of Babel”)
Pablo Neruda (Neftali Ricardo Reyes Basualto), Canto General (“The Heights of MacchuPichhu”)
Miguel Angel Asturias, Mr. President
Octavio Paz, Children of the Mire (“A Tradition Against Itself,” “Children of the Mire,” “The Pachuco and Other Extremes”)

Clarice Lispector, Family Ties (Selected Stories)
Gabriel Garcia Marquez, One Hundred Years of Solitude
Mario Vargas Llosa, The Storyteller
Isabel Allende, House of Spirits

Recommended Readings
Alvarez, Sonia, Evelina Dagnino, and Arturo Escobar, editors. Cultures of Politics/Politics of Cultures. Westview Press, 1998.
Balderston, Daniel, Mike Gonzalez and Ana Lopez, editors. Encyclopedia of Contemporary Latin American and Caribbean Cultures. Routledge, 2000.
Boland, Charles Roy, and Sally Harvey. “Magical Realism and Beyond: The Contemporary Spanish and Latin American Novel.” Antipodas: Journal of Hispanic Studies of the University of Auckland, no. 3,1991, pp. 7-12.
Castro-Klarén, Sara, editor. A Companion to Latin American Literature and Culture. Blackwell, 2008
Galeano, Eduardo. Open Veins of Latin America: Five Centuries of the Pillage of a Continent. Translated by Cedric Belfrage, Monthly Review Press, 1973.
Hirschman, Albert O., editor. Latin American Issues: Essays and Comments. Twentieth Century Fund, 1960.
Kapiszewski, Diana, editor. Encyclopedia of Latin American Politics. Oryx Press, 2002.
Kristal, Efraín, editor. The Cambridge Companion to the Latin American Novel. Cambridge UP, 2005.
Levine, Daniel. Constructing Culture and Power in Latin America. Michigan UP, 1993.
Stein, Stanley J. and Barbara H. Stein. The Colonial Heritage of Latin America: Essays on Economic Dependence in Perspective. Oxford UP, 1970.

Course Code: Eng. 513
Course Title: Contemporary South Asian Literature
Credits: 4
Full Marks: 100

Introduction

The course introduces students to a wide variety of texts by South Asian writers to make them aware of the significance of cultural and contextual influences on literary texts. It aims to sensitize students to the underlying theoretical constructs such as postcolonialism and nationalism in South Asian literature.
Intended Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of the course students will be able to:

  • read and respond to texts critically, showing an awareness of how writers use and adapt language, form and structure to create meaning in texts
  • demonstrate understanding of the socio cultural and political contexts in which texts have been produced and received
  • read and analyze texts in the light of contemporary literary theories that are relevant to the issues raised in the texts

Course Description and Content
The course introduces students to a selection of poetry, novels and prose pieces to enable them to explore the widening sphere of literature in English in South Asia. It examines the different strategies used by the writers to portray the South Asian socio-cultural and political milieu. It will provide them an opportunity to explore key issues such as, diaspora, gender, class and caste, which are overarching concerns in many of the texts.
Content
Poetry                                                                                                      A selection of poems from South Asian countries taken from The Arnold Anthology of Post-Colonial Literatures (ed. John Thieme), as well as other anthologies of poetry (Nissim Ezekiel till today) including selections from Kaiser Haq: Published in the Streets of Dhaka.

Extracts and Short Pieces
Nirad C. Chaudhuri, “My Birthplace” (from The Autobiography of an Unknown Indian)
Satyajit Ray, “Big Bill”
Rohinton Mistry, “The Collectors”
Amit Chaudhuri, “Sandeep’s Visit” (extract from the novella A Strange and Sublime Address)
Vikram Seth, “A Suitable Boy” (extract from A Suitable Boy)
Jhumpa Lahiri, Selected stories from Interpreter of Maladies

 

Novels
Syed Walliullah, Tree Without Roots
Mulk Raj Anand, Untouchable
R.K. Narayan, The Guide/ Waiting for the Mahatma
Amitav Ghosh, The Shadow Lines
Arundhati Roy, The God of  Small Things
 

Recommended Readings
Alam, Fakrul, editor. Dictionary of Literary Biography: South Asian Writers in English. Thomson Gale, 2006.
Alam, Fakrul. Imperial Entanglements and Literature in English. Writer’s ink, 2007.
Dasgupta, Sayantan, editor,  A South Asian Nationalism Reader. Arnold Heinemann, 1974.
King, Bruce. Modern Indian Poetry in English. Oxford UP, 2001.
Mukherjee, Meenakshi, The Twice Born Fiction.  Heinemann Education Press, 1972.
Walsh, William, Indian Literature in English. Addison-Wesley Longman, 1990.
Zaman, Niaz et al, Other Englishes: Essays on Commonwealth Writing. The University Press Ltd, 1991.

Course Code : Eng. 514
Course Title : Research Methods in Literature
Credits : 4
Full Marks : 100

* Only students obtaining a grade of B+ and above in B.A. (Hons.) will be eligible to take this course.

Introduction
This course introduces students to research strategies and methods for finding various materials (primary and secondary sources) in various formats (print, digital, film etc) and incorporating them in their research. The course will focus on locating, evaluating, selecting and using primary and secondary materials within a theoretical framework to find an answer to the research question.

Intended Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • understand key concepts in theory and research, and the process of conducting research
  • explore the prevalent theoretical and practical research methods in literary studies
  • find, evaluate and analyze sources of information
  • write an abstract and do a literature review
  • integrate critical and literary theories in their research
  • develop referencing skills
  • write a research paper
  • understand the concept and dangers of plagiarism
  • present their research before an audience
  • understand the importance of publishing and learn how to find a proper home for the paper

Course Description and Content
This course will help the learners to carry out individual research on a selected topic. The aim will be to ultimately produce a 4000 word research paper of publishable quality and to identify appropriate publication avenues. Learners will go through the process of locating and collecting information, documenting, building arguments, drafting and redrafting while writing the research paper. Students will learn to apply theories in their research papers.
Content

  • what is research?
  • types of research (qualitative, quantitative, archival research, interdisciplinary research, digital humanities)
  • conducting research: the role of a researcher
  • ethics of research
  • understanding and avoiding plagiarism
  • choosing the appropriate research topic (focus, conceptualization); Generating research questions
  • accessing information (using the library, reference books, internet etc.)
  • writing an abstract with key words
  • writing a research proposal
  • understanding different parts of a research paper
  • literature review
  • collecting and analyzing primary and secondary sources (interviews, textual criticism)
  • making a working bibliography
  • using quotations, paraphrasing, summarizing in the appropriate manner
  • referencing (e.g. in-text citation, works cited, bibliography in MLA format, footnotes, endnotes, appendices etc.)
  • making a presentation

 
Assessment
The assessment for this course will be different from the others. 30 marks of the course will be reserved for the research paper, 10 marks for attendance and presentation, and 60 marks for the final exam.

Recommended Readings

Altick, Richard D., and J. Fenstermaker. The Art of Literary Research. Norton, 1992.
Ballenger, Bruce. The Curious Researcher: A Guide to Writing Research Papers. Longman, 1994.
Belcher, Wendy Laura. Writing Your Journal Article in Twelve Weeks: A Guide to Academic Publishing Success. SAGE, 2009.
Booker, M. Keith. A Practical Introduction to Literary Theory and Criticism. Longman, 1996.
Booth, Wayne C., Gregory G. Colomb, and Joseph M. Williams. The Craft of Research. Chicago UP, 1995.
Cohen, Louis, Lawrence Manion and Keith Morrison. Research Methods in Education. Routledge, 2011.
Creswell, John W. Research Design: Qualitative, Quantitative, and Mixed Methods Approaches. SAGE, 2009.
Eliot, Simon, and W.R. Owens, editors. A Handbook to Literary Research. Routledge, 1998.
Griffin, Gabriele, editor. Research Methods for English Studies. Edinburgh UP, 2005.
Kehler, Dorothea. Problems in Literary Research: A Guide to Selected Reference Works. Scarecrow Press, 1996.
“MLA Guide,” OWL at Purdue. 2017, www.owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/01/.
MLA Handbook: 8th Edition. The Modern Language Association of America, 2016.
Sinha, M.P. Research Methods in English. Atlantic Publishers, 2007.

Course Code : 515
Course Title : African and Caribbean Literature
Credits : 4
Full Marks : 100

Introduction

This course introduces students to African and Caribbean literature with a view to creating an awareness of the broadening spheres of literature in English. In addition, the course intends to help students move away from dominant Eurocentric and Western perspectives and appreciate Africa-centered perspectives on culture and literature. It aims to create an awareness of the relationships between history, theory and literary production in Africa and in the Caribbean region using contemporary theories, such as post-colonialism, Marxism, feminism, post-structuralism and others.
Intended Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • critically analyze the language, form and perspectives of different genres of literary texts from African and Caribbean literary traditions
  • demonstrate an understanding of the socio-cultural and political contexts in which the texts have been produced and received
  • critically engage with the literary texts in the light of colonial and postcolonial histories and contemporary theories that are relevant to the issues raised in the texts
  • connect African literature to their own landscape

Course Description and Content
This course introduces students to a new and wide range of genres of contemporary African and Caribbean literature. Students will study short stories, novels, plays, and poetry produced by prominent African and Caribbean writers.  It helps students to identify the distinctive features of African literature.

Content
Novels, Plays, and Short Stories
Wole Soyinka, The Strong Breed/ The Road/ The Lion and the Jewel
Chinua Achebe, A Man of the People/ Anthills of the Savannah
Ngũgĩwa Thiong’o, Petals of Blood

  1. M. Coetzee, Waiting for the Barbarians/ Foe

Nuruddin Farah, Sweet and Sour Milk
Nadine Gordimer, July’s People
Alex La Guma, Time of the Butcherbird
Ama Ata Aidoo, The Girl Who Can and Other Stories (Selections)
AyiKwei Armah, TheBeautyful Ones Are Not Yet Born
Aime Cesáire, Discourse on Colonialism 

Poetry
Leopold Sedar Senghor, “New York,” “Black Woman,” “Joal,” “Night of Sine”
Christopher Okigbo, Selections from Labyrinth
Derek Walcott, “A Far Cry from Africa,”“The Castaway,”“The Flock,”“Mass Man”
Edward Kamau Brathwaite, Selections from Days and NightsBlack and BluesMother Poem

Recommended Readings
Achebe, Chinua. Hopes and Impediments. Anchor, 1988.
Ashcroft, Bill, Gareth Griffith, and Helen Tiffin. The Empire Writes Back. Psychology Press,
2002.

Bobb, June. Beating a Restless Drum: The Poetics of Kamau Brathwaite and Derek Walcott.
Africa World Press, 1998.
Gibbs, James. Critical Perspectives on Wole Soyinka. Lynne Rienner Publishers, 1980.
Gikandi, Simon. Reading Chinua Achebe. James Currey Publishers, 1991.
Irele, Abiola, editor. The Cambridge Companion to the African Novel. Cambridge UP, 2009.
King, Bruce, and Kolawolen Ogungbesan, eds. A Celebration of Black and African Writing.
Ahmadu Bello UP, 1975.
—. V.S. Naipaul. Palgrave Macmillan, 2003.
Quayson, Ato. Strategic Transformations in Nigerian Writing. Indiana UP, 1997.
Soyinka,Wole. Myth, Literature and the African World. Cambridge UP, 1990.
Thiong’o, Ngũgĩwa. Decolonising the Mind. East African Publishers, 1994.